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New program director at ASAS

Justin_photoWe would like to welcome Justin Bartlett to ASAS as our newest Program Director. Justin joins us from the National Council of Teachers of English, where he worked as a membership and customer service director.

As a Program Director for ASAS, Justin’s responsibilities will include membership retention and recruitment, meeting logistics, and serving the ASAS membership in many other capacities. We hope that you will help us welcome Justin to the ASAS staff. We are certainly glad to have him on board.

Justin is located in our headquarters office in Champaign, IL. He can be reached via email at justinb@asas.org or by phone at 217-356-9050, ext. 121.

2014 JAM

Message about JAM 2014 from the ASAS Office

Prepping for a JAM Meeting, any annual meeting, takes the membership, volunteers, leadership and the staff about 18 months, even longer if you count site selection. When we first start working on a meeting, it seems so far away. Now with just a little over 3 months until JAM 2014, things in the office kick into high gear.

There is a special buzz this year in office for JAM 2014 – we have really worked hard to make it better than ever. First and foremost is the science – I have personally attended either the individual society meetings (ASAS, ADSA, and PSA) or the JAM since 1995 and I have been involved in planning JAM since 2006, and I can say bar none – this is our best scientific program to date. We had an amazing membership and committee response to the call for symposia and the combination of veteran overall programming committee members Dean Hawkins and Geoff Dahl and new members Connie Larson and Barry Bradford – the JAM program has been elevated to the next level!

Add to this great response, direction added by working within a theme: Linking animal science and animal agriculture: Meeting the global demands of 2050, we have managed to pull together a JAM with enough variation to appeal to all the subsets of animal science but enough cohesion to draw our fields of study together! Read more

ASAS_election_banner_TS

Tomorrow is the deadline to vote

Tomorrow is the deadline to vote in the ASAS National Election.

Voting must be completed by April 18, 2014 by 11:59 PM CST.

As a member of the American Society of Animal Science, you have the opportunity to VOTE for President-Elect and three Directors-at-Large to serve on the Board of Directors of ASAS. The term of office for each will be three years. You also have the opportunity to VOTE for a Graduate Director to serve on the ASAS Board for a two-year term. Terms for these offices will begin at the conclusion of the 2014 JAM in Kansas City, July 20-24. Read more

ASAS announces science writing internship for summer 2014

ASAS_logo1-300x296Company: American Society of Animal Science

Position: Science writing internship

Job description: The American Society of Animal Science is looking for three interns to work for eight weeks this summer (2014). Internship runs from the week of June 9 to the week of Aug. 4. Interns will work with the ASAS Scientific Communications Team to write press releases, write and edit online content, produce podcasts and create video content for ASAS sites. Interns will also travel for one week, expenses paid, to Kansas City, MO to report on the ASAS annual meeting. Read more

Recent Articles

17
Apr

Agriculture at top of global agenda

Robynne Anderson, Secretariat to the International Agri-Food Network

At some moments in the discussion of the next set of global development goals, the conversations have seemed at risk of leaving out the most basic human needs. However, it seems clear now that agriculture and food will make the top of the list for the United Nations.

The co-chairs of the United Nations discussion of Sustainable Development Goals, have listed poverty eradication number one and sustainable agriculture, food security and nutrition clustered right behind it as focus area number two. These discussions should shape global development work until 2030 as the replacement for the current Millennium Development Goals. Read more »

17
Apr

Understanding Beef Cattle Lameness Takes Knowing Where to Look

Beef cattle are naturally adept at hiding signs of weakness, which makes signs of lameness difficult to quickly diagnose.

Beef cattle are naturally adept at hiding signs of weakness, which makes signs of lameness difficult to quickly diagnose.

Eden Prairie, Minn. (April 15, 2014) – Beef cattle are naturally adept at hiding signs of weakness, and as a result, lameness prevalence in beef cattle is often underestimated.

“We see people that come out and say, ‘We don’t have issues with lameness.’ But generally speaking if you say that, you’re not looking,” said Dan Thomson, DVM, and Director of the Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University. “The experiences from veterinary school and veterinary practice prove that you miss more by not looking than by not knowing.”

Thomson said that it takes getting out with the crews and spending the time to watch the animals to see what’s really going on. Read more »

14
Apr
Image_Gallery

The Power of Visual Learning with the Animal Science Image Gallery

by Harold Hafs

            For most students, visual aids usually facilitate transfer of information, especially conceptual information.  Here follows two examples.  To view them, just key in the ASIG number into the search box on the Image Gallery home page.  The video in ASIG #3259 illustrates where and when sperm develop the capacity for motility in the excurrent ducts of the male reproductive tract.  Most of us would be challenged to create this video today!  It is even more impressive because it was a product of novel research by Richard Blandau about half century ago when few people performed video photomicrography. Read more »

14
Apr
ASIG#3259

Sperm Maturation in the Male Reproductive Tract (ASIG #3259)

by Harold Hafs

Sperm Maturation in the Male Reproductive Tract (ASIG #3259) is a 12.5-minute video of the potential for motility of sperm from the various parts of the male reproductive tract.  In this file, Richard Blandau demonstrated that sperm are immotile in the male tract, and remain mostly immotile or abnormally motile even when they are removed from the male tract.  Instead, sperm show normal progressive motility only after ejaculation.  The video illustrates one part of sperm maturation; sperm develop the capacity for motility as they are propelled by fluid flow and peristalsis through the seminiferous tubules, the epididymis, and the ductus deferens. The video contains examples of several types of circular (abnormal) motility, as well as slow motion of normal motility with rotation of the sperm head.

This image, along with other image files such as videos, animations, and sequences of images with a story in Power Point collections or ZIP files as may be found in the Image Gallery.

14
Apr
ASIG#5147

Spermatogenesis Animation (ASIG #5147)

by Harold Hafs

Spermatogenesis Animation (ASIG #5147) is a 13-minute collection of drawings created mostly by Rupert Amann, and animated/narrated by John Riesen.  It illustrates and describes the location of spermatogenesis within the seminiferous tubules of the testis, in addition to the interstitial tissue where Leydig cells produce testosterone. Animations capture each step of spermatogenesis from the perpetual renewal of spermatogonia stem cells on the basement membrane of the tubules, commitment of spermatogonia to enter spermatogenesis, mitotic division of spermatogonia to form primary spermatocytes, meiotic division to form secondary spermatocytes and spermatids, spermiogenesis wherein the spherical spermatids mature to form spermatozoa, culminating with spermiation. This entire process is nurtured by Sertoli cells that completely envelop the spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids from the first cell division until the sperm are released into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules, approximately 61 days in bulls. Tight junctions among the Sertoli cells form a basal compartment next to the basement membrane of the tubule with an environment required for the early stages of spermatogenesis, and an adluminal compartment with an environment prerequisite for the later stages of spermatogenesis. When spermatid maturation is complete and spermatozoa are released from Sertoli cells, fluid produced within the tubules transports sperm throughout the length of the tubules and out of the testis into the efferent ducts, converging in the epididymal duct forming the major functional element of the epididymis.  Sperm leaving the seminiferous tubules are infertile. Maturation of sperm occurs in the epididymis where they develop motility as described in ASIG #3259 as well as the capacity to fertilize an egg.

This image, along with other image files such as videos, animations, and sequences of images with a story in Power Point collections or ZIP files as may be found in the Image Gallery.